Celebrating 500 Years of the Protestant Reformation

October 31, 1517 marks the day that Martin Luther wrote a document – “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences” – then nailed it to the front door of the Wittenberg Castle church, sparking the Protestant Reformation.

Born in Eisleben, Germany, in 1483, Martin Luther went on to become one of Western history’s most significant figures. He spent his early years in relative anonymity as a monk and scholar. But his 95 Theses attacked the Roman Catholic Church’s corrupt practice of selling “indulgences” to absolve sin.  He emphasized two central beliefs … that the Bible is the central religious authority, and that humans may reach salvation only by their faith in God’s grace, and not by their own deeds.

A valuable online resource has been created that will aid in remembering and celebrating this historic event … Here We Stand is a 31–day journey chronicling heroes of the Reformation.  You may read and/or listen to each day’s entry this month.

An ongoing challenge for any man or woman who claims to follow Jesus is to remember that we are now standing on the shoulders of men and women who have followed in His footsteps long before us.  The introduction to this online resource states:

  • “The Reformation was not about one or two big names — Luther, Calvin, Zwingli — but about a massive movement of Christian conviction, boldness, and joy that cost many men and women their lives — and scattered the seeds that are still bearing fruit in the twenty-first century.  Not only was Luther surrounded by many Reformers in Germany, but lesser–known heroes of the faith rose up all over Europe … heroes like Heinrich Bullinger, Hugh Latimer, Lady Jane Grey, Theodere Beza, and Johannes Oecolampadius.”

Click on these two links to access these resources:

Peace & Joy!

~ tr

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s